Honda BR V Hatchback Review

Honda BR V

Honda BR V Overview

The new Honda BR-V is many things. You could call it yet another city SUV in a segment that has the hot selling Hyundai Creta and the recently updated Renault Duster. You could call it a meaner, more desirable version of the Honda Mobilio. Or, you could even think of it as the most sensible buy in the up to Rs 10 lakh price brand, for it has three rows of seating. But, how is it as a product? A day in Rajasthan did present us with some answers.\

Honda BR V Look

The Honda BR-V looks good, but there are too many things that make it look too similar to the Mobilio MUV. This is not the case with any of the other cars based on the Brio platform – the Amaze and the Mobilio have their own identities. The BR-V on the other hand, at first glance at least, looks like a Mobilio which has been given a facelift and given some new accessories. That said, the BR-V has a handsome face with the sleek headlamps, a re-imagined

Honda signature wing-like chrome grille, aggressive front bumper with a silver faux skid-plate and clam-shell bonnet. The side profile with the black lower-cladding, large 16-inch aggressive looking 5-spoke alloy wheels, large doors, stretched windows with a generously large rear quarter-glass, and the roof-rails is well proportioned. The chrome handles and the chrome strips at the bottom of the doors look quite nice for a change. Many other companies can learn a thing or two from the BR-V in this matter. Move to the rear and you get to see the other important sector where designers from the company spent a lot of time. The new tail-lamps which stretch from side-to-side (the centre part consists of reflectors only, though) makes the BR-V look wider.

However, the BR-V is not an SUV, and is at best a crossover. It does sit higher than the Mobilio though, with a ground clearance of more than 210mm the BR-V is at par with the Renault Duster AWD.

Honda BR V Comfort

We are in the top of the line VX trim. And it certainly feels better than the Mobilio here. But, it can’t match the Creta for opulence, quality or the feel good factor. The design is likeable though – lots of lines, cuts, surface changes and finishes. It might lack harmony but is attention grabbing. To know more info on Honda BR V visit Midasedu

The BR-V’s insides are ergonomically sound too. The driving position is more car like than SUV, and therefore feels natural and comfortable. The steering, the gear shifter, and the pedal positioning feels absolutely right. Even the controls – stalks for light and wipers, buttons for climate control and stereo, and the accessibility to the various cup and bottle holders and stowage spaces is easy to get used to.

Space, of course, is a big plus. The BR-V isn’t as wide as the Duster or the Creta, so shoulder room isn’t exactly impressive. And three adults in the second row is a squeeze. But, in terms of head room and making one believe that they are in a spacious car, the Honda BR-V does really well. Managing kneeroom for all three rows of occupants is what the BR-V excels at thanks to a sliding second row. And if you are going to be using the BR-V for weekend getaways, the boot space works out fine too, even with the last row in place. Plus it has comfortable seats and all of them recline. It’s also easy to get into the last row courtesy the full tumble function for the second row of seats. The low ingress height helps too.

Feature wise, the Honda BR-V struggles to match up to the Hyundai Creta. It gets keyless entry and go, a multifunctional steering wheel, single zone climate control with rear aircon vents and a trip computer as well. Plus, the BR-V gets front dual airbags as standard across all variants. But, unlike the Creta, you can’t have the BR-V with six airbags, or a touchscreen multimedia system with internal memory and satnav, or (and this is a big miss) parking sensors; forget a reversing camera.

Honda BR V Gearbox

The diesel SUV gets the 1.5-litre i-DTEC engine from the City. The unit is quiet at idling, but gets noisy post 2,000rpm and stays that way to its 4,000rpm redline. But, according to Honda, the NVH has improved compared to the Mobilio. And one can tell both at idle and when driving. The engine makes 99bhp of max power and 200Nm of peak torque. In the real world this means good pulling power even from lower revs. Only catch is to avoid slipping under 1500rpm to avoid the lag. Power is sent to the front wheels through a six-speed manual gearbox which is a little notchy but the light clutch makes easy work of driving in traffic. Check car loan interest calculator.

The petrol BR-V is powered by a 1.5-litre i-VTEC mill that belts out 118bhp of power and 145Nm of torque. This comes mated to a six-speed manual as well. But, additionally, there’s the option of an automatic, a CVT to be precise. This one too uses a front-wheel-drive layout. The petrol is quieter and more refined compared to the diesel. It revs well too and is best enjoyed when given the stick.

The Honda BR-V, for all its SUV posturing, still doesn’t lend high seating. Which isn’t bad given it is more comfortable as a result and because the visibility, particularly over the hood, is good, it never feels difficult to drive or manoeuvre. It is easy to live within the city helped by a relatively tight 5.3m turning radius. The steering is light and responsive and it also weighs up nicely at speeds. The ride is sorted too. It is firm but is absorbent at speed and doesn’t thud too much over poor roads either. And it manages unseen speed bumps and undulations well too. Straight-line stability again is commendable and the BR-V feels confident and completely home handling the fast sweeping corners too. To top it all, the brakes have good bite and progression and there’s ABS in this top of the line VX version for added reassurance.

With ARAI claimed fuel efficiencies of 15.4kmpl for the petrol and 21.9kmpl for the diesel, the car boasts of the best-in-segment fuel economy. Pretty impressive on paper. The figures in real world conditions will be clear when we do a thorough road test soon. First impressions suggest- it won’t be a tough task.

Honda BR V Riding

The drive quality of Honda BR-V is enhanced with electric power steering, and easy accessibility to control lever of acceleration, clutch and brake, assuring stress-free long drives. The strong build quality, tough suspension and the superior quality of interiors offer great comfort to the occupants.This setup helps the Honda BR-V when you want to push it a little harder than one would think is sensible. Book Honda BR V Test drive.

We didn’t get too many corners, but from whatever little we did, we liked the quick and predictable steering response, the sure -footedness, and the reined in body roll. Something we did get a lot of, however, was undulating stretches, long and fast corners, and wayward motorcyclists. And in these conditions, the BR-V shone. It rides flat over undulations no matter what speed, feels planted and adjustable around fast bends, and brakes brilliantly with hardly a twitch when a motorcyclist turns into your path without looking.

Honda BR V Safety

The Honda BR-V is a great handler. Especially the petrol engine. Ride is not too supple and not too stiff and the steering offers right amount of feedback. Throw the BR-V petrol into a corner and you would come out at the other end gracefully. However, this car is in no way meant to do lap times. On the safety front, the BR-V gets ABS and dual front airbags as standard across all variants. This is a good move considering the car priced slightly higher.

Honda BR V Price in Pune

Honda Brv On-Road Price in Pune ranges from 5,55,006 to 16,44,139 for variants BRV E Petrol and BRV VX Diesel respectively. Honda Brv is available in 8 variants and 6 colours. Below are details of Honda Brv variants price in Pune. Check for BR V price in Pune at Autozhop.

Honda BR V Bottomline

Honda is a little late to the compact SUV party. But, the BR-V has its USPs, its pluses, which should have buyers consider it. Three rows of seating for one. Then you have efficient engines, utility, dynamics and a premium badge to sweeten the deal. However, do note, the BR-V cannot off-road, it doesn’t pack in as many features or exude the same aura of premiumness as the Creta. The decider now will be its pricing. If priced under the Duster and the Creta, and by a noticeable margin, the Honda BR-V is certainly worth it.

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